Haystacks, High Crag, High Stile, Red Pike


Forum » Walk Reports » Lake District

By Oli R C on 15/07/17 at 12:40pm

Hills walked:
Red Pike (Buttermere) (Wainwright, Birkett, Hewitt, Nuttall, Fellranger, Synge, Sim, and Tump)
High Stile (Birkett, Marilyn, Hewitt, Nuttall, HuMP, Fellranger, Synge, Sim, and Tump)
High Stile (Wainwright and Birkett)
High Crag (Buttermere) (Wainwright, Birkett, Hewitt, Nuttall, Fellranger, Synge, Sim, and Tump)
Seat (Birkett, Dodd, Dewey, Synge, and Tump)
Haystacks (Buttermere) (Wainwright, Birkett, Dodd, Dewey, Fellranger, Synge, and Tump)
Little Round How (Synge)
Date started:09/07/2017
Distance:21.7 km or 13.5 miles
Ascent:1257m or 4124ft
Start OSGB:NY176170
Time taken:8:43
Naismith:6:26

I headed off to Buttermere for my 3rd walk in this area, in recent weeks. This time, my targets were on the southern side of the valley. Heading off from my parking spot above St James shortly after 6am, the skies were looking dramatic, with cloud scooping over all but the lowest hills. The forecast was for things to clear up at about 1pm until 3pm.

I head off towards the lake, fixated on the ever changing conditions above me. Haystacks looks great...

All objectives in cloud.

All objectives in cloud. by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

New signage since my last visit...

3 Lambs Killed

3 Lambs Killed by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Some trail maintenance happening at Dalegarth/Hassness...

Trail Maintenance at Dalegarth/Hassness

Trail Maintenance at Dalegarth/Hassness by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Cloud swinging low above Warnscale. I actually drove over Honister Pass on my journey to Buttermere, so I already had an idea of what to expect...

Fleetwith Pike and Haystacks

Fleetwith Pike and Haystacks by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

There is some sunlight and blue sky to be had...

Seat

Seat by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

The beginning of the climb up Warnscale Beck...

Streak of light on Haystacks

Streak of light on Haystacks by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

The path on the other side of the beck...

Other side of the beck

Other side of the beck by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Warnscale Bothy, virtually invisible until you get close...

Bothy, blending in.

Bothy, blending in. by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

In-Bothy entertainment system...

Deck of cards

Deck of cards by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Reaching the top, I find Little Round How...

Little Round How

Little Round How by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

I took a quick excursion to the top of Little Round How, but in that time, the cloud moved in. By the I time came back to the path, this was how it looked...

Little Round How in cloud

Little Round How in cloud by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

So I turn for Haystacks. Green Crag, up first...

Green Crag

Green Crag by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Campers by Blackbeck Tarn...

Campers by Blackbeck Tarn

Campers by Blackbeck Tarn by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Blackbeck Tarn...

Blackbeck Tarn

Blackbeck Tarn by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Between Green Crag and Haystacks...

Green Crag right, Haystacks left.

Green Crag right, Haystacks left. by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

In front of Haystacks

In front of Haystacks by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

A glimpse of Warnscale Beck

A glimpse of Warnscale Beck by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

I take the long way around Innominate Tarn...

Innominate Tarn

Innominate Tarn by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

After some peacefully calm dips and some windy peaks, I eventually see the summit...

Haystacks Summit

Haystacks Summit by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

As I arrived at the summit, another two walkers popped up at the other side. Amusingly, one had a fishing rod, and they explained that they were heading to Blackbeck Tarn to catch Trout! As they led me to understand, the fish stock in the tarn is not managed. Theories being either that fish were stranded during the volcanic activity that formed the landscape, or that eggs were put in the tarn during the Victorian period, and the fish subsequently fished for sport. Anybody know the answer? I'll go for the latter.

So I head off down towards Scarth Gap. A bigger descent that I had envisaged, with some nice outcrops of rock to negotiate. Once I get beneath the cloud, the scale of my next task becomes clearer. The great looking ascent to Seat...

In Scarth Gap looking up to Seat

In Scarth Gap looking up to Seat by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

The cloud cover seems to lift at a similar rate to my ascent. A lovely view back over Seat, to Haystacks. Some walkers behind me...

Looking back to Seat, with Haystacks behind

Looking back to Seat, with Haystacks behind by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

And then the rather intimidating ascent of High Crag. Steep and prolonged, it took me just short of half an hour to get to the top...

Looking up to High Crag

Looking up to High Crag by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Finally at the top of High Crag, the now frequent breaks in cloud reveal this stunning view...

Smouldering Haystacks

Smouldering Haystacks by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

High Crag summit...

High Crag Summit

High Crag Summit by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

A bite to eat, and some time spent watching the ever changing views into Ennerdale, I eventually set off for High Stile...

Looking ahead to High Stile

Looking ahead to High Stile by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

The cloud is lifting over to the north, too...

Looking over Buttermere

Looking over Buttermere by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Climbers make their way up Grey Crags (just visible in this photo, if you know where to look). Something strange - I could hear a metallic pinging sound at this point, at a frequency similar to a creaking tree swaying in a gentle breeze. Maybe something to do with the climbers? Who knows...

Climbers on Grey Crag

Climbers on Grey Crag by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Favourite shot of the day, the view from High Stile...

View from High Stile

View from High Stile by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Bleaberry Tarn...

Bleaberry Tarn

Bleaberry Tarn by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

So a gentle walk along to Red Pike, upon reaching the summit I have a bit of a look down the path towards Dodd. I had planned to take this descent, but also had an alternative option of carrying on along the top to Scale Beck if time allowed. Well it was still only early afternoon, so the extended route is the option taken, but seeing the steepness of the descent to Dodd, and the subsequent drop-off from Bleaberry Tarn, let's just say I wasn't too bothered about missing it. Perhaps a challenge for another day, when the legs aren't quite as tired!

A bit of a scree scramble path from the top of Red Pike, before flattening out...

Path to Scale Force

Path to Scale Force by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Where path becomes beck (briefly)...

Scale Beck

Scale Beck by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Rock step...

Scale Beck Rock Step

Scale Beck Rock Step by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

At times, the side of this narrow path has some steep drops off into the beck. In the harsh midday light it can be difficult to spot some of these drops as they are shrouded in vegetation. It even looks like some of the path is in the very early phase of crumbling away at these sections. So do take care if you take a walk through here.

Finally, I'm spat out at the bottom of the hill. A couple relax on a rock, by the bridge...

Below Scale Force

Below Scale Force by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Onwards for the walk above Crummock Water. I really like this rocky path. Eventually it meets up with the shoreline route, before talking you along side Buttermere Dubs. It's now a beautiful sunny day.

Photographing St James

Photographing St James by Oliver Coats, on Flickr

Another cracking walk in the Lakes. Hope you've enjoyed reading! :D

A few more photos on my Flickr page, if anyone is interested... https://flic.kr/s/aHskZSq7vW



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