Ballageich


Forum » Walk Reports » Scotland

By Chris Mac on 14/09/15 at 11:35pm

Date started:07/09/2014
Distance:2.0 km or 1.2 miles
Ascent:58m or 190ft
Naismith:0:30

A childhood sledging hill from when I lived in Eaglesham although it looked a lot bigger way back then!

Ballageich sits on the northern side of the Eaglesham Moor right next to Whitelee Windfarm and for the couple of minutes it takes to climb to the cairn from the lay-by on the B764 you would be hard pushed to find a better view anywhere for such little effort. :)

Park at the lay-by across the road from Greenfield Hill and the radio mast, Ballageich is just off camera to the right...

Just over two minutes later i'm at the cairn looking east towards East Kilbride but still 6 feet (in height) to go until the summit!

Looking south east towards Dunwan Dam with the windfarm sprawling out over the Eaglesham Moor.

South towards Whitelee with Dunwan hill the small mound to the left of the photo then Blackwood Hill, Lochgoin Reservoir and Greenfield hill on the right.

Looking south west and you can just make out the peaks of the Arran hills in the distance.

Looking west.

North west towards Clydebank and Lochcraig Reservoir.

Glasgow to the north,

A panoramic looking north with Glasgow and the highlands in the distance.

Unfortunately the view south is dominated by wind turbines...

We decide to go and climb Loudoun Hill next so quickly go to the uneventful summit of Ballageich then down the hill slightly to the north to take a few more pics and soak in the view a bit longer.

Looking NNE towards the city centre with the Castlemilk flats visible to the right.

East towards EK.

Back past the cairn...

Time for one last zoom look towards EK with the three blocks of flats at St. Leonards in the distance and EK town centre on the right.

...and down towards the car to complete a very quick walk.

Looking back at Ballageich to see a man and son reaching the cairn, enjoy the view!

Onwards to Loudoun hill next....



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