WalkLakes Blog

Tags: All books equipment GPS John Ruskin Jonathan Otley maps news review safety walks

2021

October  
Busy and Tragic October Start for the Team  
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July  
Buttermere shuttle bus from Cockermouth  
Labels and Footbridges  
Lake District Trig Points  
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June  
The Missing Toposcope  
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May  
Camping in the Lake District  
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February  
Chris Lewis Support Fund  
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January  
An Appeal from Cumbria's Mountain Rescue teams  
Lake District to feature on New Stamp  
2020: a Mixed Year for Mountain Rescue  

2020

December  
New Visitors to Cumbria remain a Problem  
The Fell Top Assessors are Back  
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October  
Walking Near Cattle  
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July  
Camping in the Lake District  
Coronavirus News  
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June  
The Keswick to Threlkeld Path Tunnel  
Rydal Cave  
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May  
A Plea from Patterdale MRT  
Pooley Bridge Replacement  
.
March  
Meet Skye  
.

• Lake District Trig Points

We've been looking back at some of our favourite trig points.

The tops of many hills in Great Britain are marked by trig points erected by Ordnance Survey and they make a welcome, and literal, high point to your walk. Although long since becoming redundant as far as Ordnance Survey are concerned as they've been overtaken by aerial photography and GPS the network of trig points was used to re-survey Britain back in 1936 when it became clear that Ordnance Survey needed more accurate mapping than they had before.  read more ...


• New Visitors to Cumbria remain a Problem

The LDSAMRA have issued a press release talking about the problems that the rise in inexperienced walkers is causing them.

The Lake District Search and Mountain Rescue Association have issued a press release talking about the problems that the rise in inexperienced walkers is causing them.  read more ...


• Walking Near Cattle

There's been a number of incidents recently across the UK with walkers being badly injured or killed by cattle. We've got some thoughts on how to avoid the next walker being you.

Although less common than sheep you may come across cattle on your walk in the Lake District. Cows present a real problem as they are a danger to both you and your dog and every year people are killed or seriously injured by cows, with fractures to arms, ribs, wrist, scapula, clavicle, legs, lacerations, punctured lung, bruising, black eyes, joint dislocation, nerve damage and unconsciousness being among the reported injuries.  read more ...


• Coronavirus News

The Lake District is now cautiously re-opening and the LDNPA have been updating their guidance which is worth a read if you're thinking of coming this way.
[Last revised on 4th July]

The Lake District is now cautiously re-opening as many attractions, restaurants, pubs and overnight accommodation reopened on 4th July. The Lake District National Park Authority have been updating their guidance which is worth a read if you're thinking of coming this way. You can find their page here and it's been revised pretty much every day.  read more ...


• The Keswick to Threlkeld Path Tunnel

The path from Keswick to Threlkeld along the old railway line is currently being restored after Storm Desmond. As part of that a long closed tunnel is being re-opened.

Back in December 2015 Storm Desmond did significant damage all over the Lake District and for us one of the big losses the destruction of two of the bridges over the River Greta on the path from Keswick to Threlkeld along the old railway line which resulted in the temporary loss and the later diversion of one our earliest walks.  read more ...


• Rydal Cave

As people can now visit the Lake District and go for walks we've been considering what we can sensibly recommend.

As people can now visit the Lake District and go for walks we've been considering what we can sensibly recommend and we have several walks around Loughrigg Fell which is a gentle fell which you should be able to summit safely. These walks also take in Rydal Cave.  read more ...



WalkLakes recognises that hill walking, or walking in the mountains, is an activity with a danger of personal injury or death.
Participants in these activities should be aware of and accept these risks and be responsible for their own actions.